Flood-Prepared Communities
Project

Flood-Prepared Communities

Flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster in the U.S., significantly affecting homes, businesses, infrastructure, and the environment. Since 2000, flood-related disasters in the U.S. accounted for more than $850 billion in damage and losses.

Pew aims to reduce these impacts by improving policies and planning at the federal and state levels to:

  • Enhance pre-disaster mitigation: Directing more resources toward and increasing the use of proactive approaches, such as removing properties from flood-prone areas, increasing green space, and restoring and protecting flood plains, will limit the effects and cost of floods.
  • Ensure infrastructure is flood-ready: Updating the nation’s roads, bridges, schools, hospitals, and other critical infrastructure to better withstand future flood events will help improve community resilience and reduce taxpayer losses.
  • Establish flood-resilient states: Systematic planning and adoption of nature-based solutions to address flood risks will reduce the severity of floods, boost states’ ability to withstand future storms, and lower disaster costs.
  • Modernize federal flood insurance: Reforming the National Flood Insurance Program to reflect current and future threats; remove incentives for development in flood-prone areas; and break the costly cycle of flooding, damage, and repair will help the program better meet its goals of lowering federal spending on disaster response and rebuilding.
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
Article

Pew-Led Network Helps States Plan for Flooding

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Article

Long after the COVID-19 pandemic ends, state governments will continue to face monumental challenges, including what promises to be a sustained future with increased climate-related disaster risks. This grim reality, long forecast by climate scientists, has been made clear yet again in 2020, a record year for wildfires and hurricanes. And this problem is growing at a time when states are already grappling with budget shortfalls that are unlikely to ease soon.

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Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk

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Since 2000, floods have cost the United States more than $845 billion in damage to homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure. The expense of adapting to more frequent and severe storms is projected to rise over the next several decades, placing a premium on the need to take action now to reduce the impacts of future floods.

It's Time to Make U.S. Infrastructure Flood-Ready