Small Businesses, Jobs, and Philadelphia's Road to an Inclusive Recovery

State of the city 2021 virtual event

With vaccinations increasing and significant federal relief forthcoming, the time is ripe to look toward Philadelphia’s future, with a focus on achieving an inclusive economic recovery. How can the city support the creation of new businesses and family-sustaining jobs so that economic growth benefits all Philadelphians and builds community wealth?

Ensuring that the path forward addresses long-term challenges, including racial inequity, requires a clear view of the city’s current state and recent past. With an eye toward that, The Pew Charitable Trusts, in partnership with The Philadelphia Inquirer, presented a livestream event on April 30 offering a look back, plus data and discussions to help plan ahead.

First, Pew experts contextualized the COVID-19 pandemic’s impacts on Philadelphia’s trajectory by sharing findings from Pew’s 2021 “State of the City” report, as well as analysis of new data on the state of the city’s small-to-midsize businesses and middle-wage jobs.

Then reporters from The Philadelphia Inquirer led two panel discussions with local policymakers and economic development experts to explore what inclusive recovery would look like through two lenses: businesses and jobs, with a particular focus on city policies to support growth.

 

Agenda

  • 9 a.m.: Opening remarks
  • 9:05 a.m.: An overview of Pew’s 2021 “State of the City” research and economic findings
    • Elinor Haider, director, Pew’s Philadelphia research and policy initiative
  • 9:15 a.m.: Panel discussion on preserving and growing small and local businesses
    • Moderator: Christian Hetrick, business reporter, The Philadelphia Inquirer
    • Della Clark, president and CEO, The Enterprise Center
    • Michael A. Rashid, commerce director, city of Philadelphia
    • Rick Sauer, executive director, Philadelphia Association of Community Development Corporations
  • 9:50 a.m.: Panel discussion on supporting and increasing middle-wage jobs
  • 10:25 a.m.: Closing remarks
    • Sophie Bryan, senior manager, Pew’s Philadelphia research and policy initiative

Continue the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #PhillyStateoftheCity

EVENT DETAILS
Date: Friday, April 30, 2021
Time: 9:00 AM to 10:30 AM EDT
Location: Webcast
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